Keeping Everyone Involved in Group Lessons

This article deals with one of the problems that, for many teachers, is the most challenging: how do we keep everyone involved while at the same time, giving due attention to the problems of individuals?

You will find several solutions and discover why this calculation is correct!

. Group Instrumental Teaching III – Keeping Everyone Involved

Group Instrumental Teaching & Mixed Abilities

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As we all know, group teaching is a controversial topic. One of the most frequent objections to it (in my experience) is that since no two students will progress at the same rate, or in the same way, the activity is doomed to failure because the less able students will hold the faster learners back and conversely, the faster learners will leave the slower ones behind.  A ‘lose-lose’ situation, to coin a phrase.

However, I believe that these differences can indeed be accommodated

Continue reading “Group Instrumental Teaching & Mixed Abilities”

Keeping Everyone Involved in Group Lessons

This article deals with one of the problems that, for many teachers, is the most challenging: how do we keep everyone involved while at the same time, giving due attention to the problems of individuals.

You will find solutions and discover why this ‘equation’ is correct!

. Group Instrumental Teaching III – Keeping Everyone Involved

More on Group Instrumental Teaching

11KLAS-tmagArticleIt seems that the recent post and article in defense of group teaching has struck a chord with quite a few readers. However, whilst they did their job in defending the practice of group teaching they didn’t offer too many solutions to the challenges that teachers, especially those new to the situation, can face. Continue reading “More on Group Instrumental Teaching”

Pythagoras and the Music of the Future

Harmonic Wave 2I am just about ready to introduce the first in a projected series of articles discussing, in accessible terms I hope, the influence that the harmonic series has had on musical development since the Middle Ages. I will be discussing not only the connection between the harmonic series and timbre (the obvious one), but also the connections between this and the conventions governing musical structures such as rhythm, melody and harmony.

Ultimately, I will arrive at the conclusion that there needs to be a clear, natural (as opposed to contrived), relationship between the the diverse sets of proportions inherent in the harmonic series, and musical expression – now and in the future. Ironically, or so it might seem, I will also argue that whereas the development of functional harmony and therefore tonality was strongly influenced by our perception (maybe subliminal – I don’t know) of  the ‘inner workings’ of musical sound, the music that has already left, and will leave, tonality where it belongs – in the past – is equally bound up with these inner workings – particularly as represented by the harmonic series.

Many will know a great deal about the relationship between the harmonic series and timbre already, so may not find anything particularly new in the first article which sets the scene, so to speak.  To find out if you’re one of them, click here.

Music practice – making it happen and getting the best from it

Here is a short article about the thorny issue of music practice – how the teacher’s guidance during the lesson can make it more meaningful and desirable to the student, and how careful a choice of words can make a big difference to attitudes to practice.  All very important because of course, the majority of the learning takes place away from the lessons and the teacher! Excuse me…

Do beginner musicians need to read music so soon?

It is so often taken for granted (students, parents and teachers) that early music lessons will involve learning to read music. After all it’s essential isn’t it? Well, I’m not so sure it is.

In this article, I discuss some of the pitfalls of insisting that beginners – particularly children – read music before they can play with a degree of fluency. Let’s Make Music…